Posted in Valheim

Valheim: The Wolf Pack

This last post for the week will finally catch us up to the point we left off in the game the past weekend! Told you that we’d accomplished a lot!

Once the silver in the mountains started rolling in, we identified the bottleneck in materials to be the wolf parts. We knew that wolves were tamable – though we didn’t know that wolves followed when tame. So, we headed up to the small mountain biome near our base in search of wolves.

We found exactly two of them, and between Syn and I, we led the angry critters all the way back to our base. Looking back on it, if I’d known that tame wolves followed, I’d have done it differently. But what we did worked more or less. We just had to keep the stone walls of the pen we’d built reparied because wolves pack a punch!

In the middle of trying to tame the wolves, we got a new type of attack on our base – the smell of sulfur that indicates surtlings are on the rise.

Though these things move crazy fast in the open area (compared to the ones in the swamp), they weren’t all that difficult to fend off. I don’t know if their flames would have been bad news for things built out of wood, but we also didn’t experiment to find out.

Surtling cores are always welcome, so we didn’t mind this attack so much.

Finally, after appeasing our new wolf additions for a couple days, they became tame and began to produce cubs. I’m going to have a harder time using these wolves for what they were intended – parts for gear – simply because they do follow and stay and fight for you.

To help myself feel a little better about this situation, I picked out one wolf to be my pet and built him his own wolf house away from the others. Syn was gracious enough to let me take from our resources – and while it’s silly… I just want a wolf pet!

The only thing that’s annoying about having a wolf pack around the house is all the howling! I wish there was a way to lower the frequency of wolf sounds. We might eventually have to build a pen somewhere else so that we can sleep at night.

In the meantime, Syn had continued to cull the boar population until we had nothing left but two star boar stock. She also began to further extend the boar pens, eventually taking down the walls between the massive turnip gardens and the boars so they could roam free.

While she worked on her farming projects, I headed out to the mountains to mine silver, explore and take down monsters. I noted that I really could use an upgraded bow for the drakes – I was still only using the fine wood bow at the time. It got the job done, but butter is better.

So that started us on a mini-quest for guck, which is needed to craft the Draugr Fang bow. This led us back into the swamps for a short time, but it didn’t take too long to get what we needed to make a bow for each of us.

This was the first weapon that really made me go “wow” in this game. Just look at that glow!

Bringing back wolf parts from my expeditions – we haven’t started culling our tame wolves yet – we were also both able to create new wolf cloaks which look equal parts cool and somewhat disturbing with that wolf head on there…

That’s where we left off in last weekend’s playthrough. We still need to upgrade the gear we’ve made. We have lots of mountains to explore yet. I have found one dragon egg, and I know what it’s for.

Not a bad bit of progress for a long holiday weekend, indeed!

Author:

I'm a technical writer by day, gaming gal by night. I have a wide array of gaming interests, though I most often blog about MMOs, RPGs, and Nintendo fanstuffs. Like what you just read? Check out my Webcomic and Fantasy Fiction projects! https://aywren.com/fantasy-fiction-webcomics/

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